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Simply saying the name ‘John Calvin’ is enough to start a fight in certain circles. His teachings, the branch of theology that stems out of his ministry and writings, and those who associate themselves with him and his "T.U.L.I.P." (never mind the fact that the ‘five points of Calvinism’ were created more than 50 years after his death) can create a perfect storm resulting in division that is somewhat unique among theologically-minded Christians. Depending on whom you ask about John Calvin, one would likely get any number of descriptions of the man. His opponents might call him a heretic and a tyrant. Those outside of Christianity may see him simply as a philosopher or a well-known religious leader. Christians who ascribe to reformed theology may see him as a man of conviction, an exemplary theologian, and a thoughtful, prolific author of many doctrinal works [ ... ]
A statement made by a professor at a leading evangelical college has become a flashpoint in a controversy that really matters. In explaining why she intended to wear a traditional Muslim hijab over the holiday season in order to symbolize solidarity with her Muslim neighbors, the professor asserted that Christians and Muslims worship the same God. Is this true? The answer to that question depends upon a distinctly Christian and clearly biblical answer to yet another question: Can anyone truly worship the Father while rejecting the Son? The Christian’s answer to that question must follow the example of Christ. Jesus himself settled the question when he responded to Jewish leaders who confronted him after he had said "I am the light of the world." When they denied him, Jesus said, "If you knew me, you would know my Father also" (John 8:19). Later in that same chapter, Jesus [ ... ]  
Can a true Christian deny the virgin birth? This question would perplex the vast majority of Christians throughout the centuries, but modern denials of biblical truth make the question tragically significant. Of all biblical doctrines, the doctrine of Christ’s virginal conception has often been the specific target of modern denial and attack. Attacks upon the virgin birth emerged in the aftermath of the Enlightenment, with some theologians attempting to harmonize the anti-supernaturalism of the modern mind with the church’s teaching about Christ. The great quest of liberal theology has been to invent a Jesus who is stripped of all supernatural power, deity, and authority. The fountainhead of this quest includes figures such as Albert Schweitzer and Rudolf Bultmann. Often considered the most influential New Testament scholar of the twentieth century [ ... ]
Twenty-five years ago Neil Postman observed that television had become an American "necessity" and lamented its effects on society. He correctly described the culture of the 1980s as one that was amusing itself to death. If he were alive today, Postman would be astonished at how quickly Twitter, Facebook, and other forms of social media have gripped our society. His earlier criticisms raise an interesting question about these current trends: If TV put our culture in the casket, has social media nailed the coffin shut? Almost overnight, the budding world of social media has revolutionized the way our culture communicates. Even our vocabulary has been affected. Suddenly, people are "tagging" each other, "tweeting" about themselves, and "liking" everything they see. For the first time, it’s possible to have "friends" you’ve never even met. [ ... ]  
What associations with all that is lovely are connected with that blissful word mother! To that sound the tenderest emotions of the human heart, whether in the bosom of the savage or the sage, wake up. The beauty of that term is seen and its power felt alike by the prince and the peasant, the rustic and the philosopher. It is one of the words which infant lips are first taught to lisp, and the charm of which the infant heart first feels. It is a note to the music of which it is difficult to say whose soul most responsively vibrates, that of the parent or the child. Humanity, however semi-brutalized by oppression, ignorance, or even vice, has rarely been sunk so low as to have the last spark of maternal love extinguished or the last sensibility of this kind crushed out of it. This strength of woman’s love for her child must be turned to good account and be directed in [ ... ]
Does it matter whether the Bible is errant or inerrant, fallible or infallible, inspired or uninspired? What’s all the fuss about the doctrine of inerrancy? Why do Christians debate this issue? What difference does an inerrant Bible make? Before answering that question, we should consider in what way inerrancy doesn’t make a difference. The Chicago Statement on Biblical Inerrancy states: We affirm that a confession of the full authority, infallibility and inerrancy of Scripture is vital to a sound understanding of the whole of the Christian faith. We further affirm that such confession should lead to increasing conformity to the image of Christ. We deny that such confession is necessary for salvation. However, we further deny that inerrancy can be rejected without grave consequences both to the individual and to the church (Article 19). [ ... ]  
Theological liberals do not intend to destroy Christianity, but to save it. As a matter of fact, theological liberalism is motivated by what might be described as an apologetic motivation. The pattern of theological liberalism is all too clear. Theological liberals are absolutely certain that Christianity must be saved...from itself. Liberalism: Saving Christianity From Itself :: The classic liberals of the early twentieth century, often known as modernists, pointed to a vast intellectual change in the society and asserted that Christianity would have to change or die. As historian William R. Hutchison explains, "The hallmark of modernism is the insistence that theology must adopt a sympathetic attitude toward secular culture and must consciously strive to come to terms with it." [ ... ]  
"I do not think that anyone, anywhere, at any time brings dead people back to life." That blunt assessment comes from John Dominic Crossan, a leading figure in the Jesus Seminar, and one of the most influential authors on religion in post-Christian America. Thomas Sheehan, another fellow of the Seminar, put it even more directly: "Jesus, regardless of where his corpse ended up, is dead and remains dead." The claim that Jesus actually rose from the dead on the third day is perhaps the greatest scandal of authentic Christianity in the face of modern secularism. The bodily resurrection of Jesus is so absolutely fundamental and necessary to biblical Christianity—and to the Gospel—that its abandonment would mean the end of Christianity as revealed in the New Testament. Jesus would be just one more Palestinian rebel; one more wisdom teacher [ ... ]  
A recent poll suggests that the average pastor stays at his church for only three to four years. But that hardly seems long enough to be truly effective. In times past, pastoral tenure was typically measured in decades—when the longevity of men like John Calvin (who ministered in Geneva for 25 years until he died), Charles Simeon (who served in Cambridge for over 50 years), John Stott (who pastored in London for over 50 years), Jonathan Edwards (who preached in Northampton for over 20 years) and D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones (who served in London for nearly 30 years) was the rule, and not the exception. Even in recent times, W. A. Criswell pastored in downtown Dallas for nearly 50 years and Adrian Rogers in Memphis for 32 years. There are others in large churches to be sure who have demonstrated long time endurance serving [ ... ]  
  Back in 1990, theologian J. I. Packer recounted what he called a "Thirty Years’ War" over the inerrancy of the Bible. He traced his involvement in this war in its American context back to a conference held in Wenham, Massachusetts in 1966, when he confronted some professors from evangelical institutions who "now declined to affirm the full truth of Scripture." That was nearly fifty years ago, and the war over the truthfulness of the Bible is still not over — not by a long shot. From time to time, the dust has settled in one arena, only for the battle to erupt in another. In the 1970s, the most visible battles were fought over Fuller Theological Seminary and within the Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod. By the 1980s, the most heated controversies centered in the Southern Baptist Convention and its seminaries. [ ... ]  

Worship Service Schedule

Worship Service (in Russian):
Sunday: 9:00am - 11:00am

Worship Service (in English):
Sunday: 11:30am - 1:30pm

Youth Service (in English):
Sunday: 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Bible Hour (in Russian):
Wednesday: 7:00pm - 8:30pm

Family Service (in Russian):
See the Event Calendar

Home Groups:
Friday: 7:00pm - 9:00pm

Location

Word of Grace Bible Church
1317 NW 12th Ave
Battle Ground, WA 98604

(see on google maps)

Phone: (360) 687-3962
E-mail: church@slovo.org